HOW KNOWING YOUR DISABILITY IS POWER

 “KNOWING YOUR DISABILITY SAYS A LOT.   KNOWING HOW YOUR DISABILITY EMPOWERS YOU SAYS EVERYTHING.”

Marie W.O.W.C.P.

The slogan for the cerebral palsy community is “LIFE WITHOUT LIMITS.” Having cerebral palsy, I can debate this at least 50%. Life does have limits on a person with cp. When you have cp, your body limits you, but the limitless possibilities are when it comes to the mind. The mind can do so much more than a person with cp is given credit. The only person who can limit our minds is us. Cp does not rob the minds. At the same time, the cp might have our bodies. A person with cp has the same intelligence as an abled-body person. As people with C.P., we can learn, think, speak freely, and more. We only give up that freedom when we let what we hear from others affect us; when we decide to give up this one power that makes us feel that we can overcome the challenges and adversity we face in life, we are giving up a big part of who we are, then we become our wrapping. Thoughts can be positive and negative things. Whatever kind of thoughts we have in our minds, these thoughts say a lot about us. When we listen to what people say and take it to heart, we give up our free-thinking and thoughts.

How do I know this? The way I know this is I lived my life like this for many years. I know I can’t take a turn in life and go back to where I messed up. All  I can do is learn from how the negative part of my thoughts stopped me. 

The mind is a very complex part of being human. When your mind says you are not as adequate as others, you set yourself up for what the world tells you. When navigating, thoughts are in your head, and when others put navigating ideas and thoughts in you because they don’t see you as an equal—no wonder we as people with cp have a high depression rate and a negative image of ourselves.

 It has taken me so long to admit and accept that I’ve been a part of two communities for my entire life.

The disability community

The cerebral palsy community

Nowadays, I’m very proud of being part of these communities. However, I wasn’t always. When you are born with a disability, you will be ashamed of it at some point, but there will be a time in life when you come to a crossroads and have to face what road you want to take. Do I take the road that will put me in my so-called jail and not let myself accept who I am? Do I go down the road to give myself the limitless possibility that people tell the cerebral palsy community we can have?

I have said in a previous blog that the C.P. bodies have their limits since our cp won’t let us move the way we would like but also, in the same blog, I stated that our minds are limitless because the cp doesn’t have anything to do with our minds. As individuals with cerebral palsy, we are the only ones who can stop our minds from having limitless possible. That’s if we don’t put our minds in prison. We can put our minds in prison by inserting negative thoughts in our jar (mind). We have the average intelligence as an able-body person. It’s all the negativity we can put on ourselves by listening to how others only see our wrapping and not seeing what is under the wrapping.

Suppose we keep on listening to what’s on the outside. The people that shouldn’t matter to us ( i.e., people that say we aren’t going amount to anything, to the people that think, look at that poor person in the wheelchair or using the walker to the group of kids picking on the kid that takes just a little longer to catch up to his buddies on the playground.) If we worry about this every time we hear it from people and take it to heart, we also hold ourselves back due to people that shouldn’t matter. On the other hand, if we heard these things from people that know us. That’s when we should speak up. 

When I started to know my disability, I wanted to have my voice heard in every part of the cerebral palsy community. I quickly learned that the compassion for what I wanted to do for the community I’m a part of was fading away. If you think you’re going to fix everything in the cp community, you’re not. I wanted to know and be a part of;  I wanted my voice heard in every community aspect.

 I lost my compassion for being a mentor in the cp community. I also lost the idea of what I wanted to do within the community.  I took some time off from the community. After years of putting my compassion is something I never wanted to be.

During this time, I became more independent. I moved out on my own. My independence just blossomed into something that I could never have imagined. Here I was in my 40’s having my place,  with cp, something that I only dreamt about, yet I thought I wouldn’t achieve this in life, but like everything I do, I set out to commit to it to the best of my abilities.

I moved out during a time of life when the world was in the middle of a pandemic. What I always dreamt about when moving on my own wasn’t going to happen. I had to mostly spend the first on my own with very few people coming to visit or helping me because the world wasn’t allowed to live like normal. 

During the first year of living on my own, I stepped away from the cp community because the community can be challenging and cruel to others within the community. I didn’t want to ask about being independent out in the open and have people bully me for questions I may have requested. I learned very early on when I started my journey within the committee and found out that there are so many types of cp. With every kind of cp comes the different needs and different ways to be independent—also, firm opinions of how a person with cp should hold themselves in the world. No two cp’s are alike; no two families raise their child the same way.  When the cp community gets together, we can be hard on each other, from having our own strong opinions that aren’t being taken seriously in today’s world. To those who are just a little more independent than others—no wonder, we have trouble getting along as a community. My question, to my society, is, how come we are fighting for the respect of the outside world, but when we are within our society, we can’t respect each other, just remember caring starts at home. 

Once I felt I was in the right place in life, I long to go back. Being away from the cerebral palsy community, I started missing it. I realized how much it helped me accept who I was with cp. It also got me to understand the power that my cerebral palsy gives me. Now that I’m fully independent, I have more to offer people in the community by sharing my new chapter.

“Knowing the power of your disability can make you look at life a little easier. Understanding your disability can not only empower you but those we teach around you.

Marie W.O.W.C.P.

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I have said in a previous blog that the C.P. bodies have their limits since our cp won’t let us move the way we would like but also, in the same blog, I stated that our minds are limitless because the cp doesn’t have anything to do with our minds. As individuals with cerebral palsy, we are the only ones who can stop our minds from having limitless possible. That’s only if we don’t put our minds in prison. We can put our minds in prison by inserting negative thoughts in our jar (mind). We have the average intelligence as an able-body person. It’s all the negativity we can put on ourselves by listening to how others only see our wrapping and not seeing what is under the wrapping.

One of the unfortunate things about the human race is whether disabled or not. When we look at our reflection, we are only looking at our external reflection; we are missing the best part of us, the internal reflection that makes more our physical appearance. The reflection that makes us more then our cerebral palsy. The one thing in us that is more than anyone can know. 

Suppose we keep on listening to what’s on the outside. The people that shouldn’t matter to us ( i.e., people that say we aren’t going amount to anything, to the people that think, look at that poor person in the wheelchair or using the walker to the group of kids picking on the kid that takes just a little longer to catch up to his buddies on the playground.) If we worry about this every time we hear it from people and take it to heart, we also hold ourselves back due to people that shouldn’t matter. On the other hand, if we heard these things from people that know us. That’s when we should speak up. 

When I started to get to know my disability, I wanted to have my voice heard in every part of the cerebral palsy community. I quickly learned that the compassion for what I wanted to do for the community I’m a part of was fading away. If you think you’re going to fix everything in the cp community, you’re not. There is so much about the cerebral palsy commutty that I wanted to know and be a part of;  I wanted my voice heard in every part of the communtiy.

 I lost my compassion for being a mentor in the cp community. I also lost the idea of what I wanted to do within the community.  I took some time off from the community. After years of putting my compassion is something I never wanted to be a part of.

During this time, I became more independent. I moved out on my own. My independence just blossomed into something that I could never have imagined. Here I was in my 40’s having my own place,  with cp, something that I only dreamt about, yet I thought I wouldn’t achieve this in life, but like everything, I do, I set out to commit to it to the best of my abilities

I moved out during a time of life when the world was in the middle of a pandemic. What I always dreamt about when moving on my own wasn’t going to happen. I had to mostly spend the first on my own with very few people coming to visit or helping me because the world wasn’t allowed to live like normal. 

During the first year of living on my own, I stepped away from the cp community because the community can be challenging and cruel to others within the community. I didn’t want to ask about being independent out in the open and have people bully me for questions I may have requested. I learned very early on when I started my journey within the committee and found out that there are so many types of cp. With every kind of cp comes the different needs and different ways to be independent—also, firm opinions of how a person with cp should hold themselves in the world. No two cp’s are alike; no two families raise their child the same way.  When the cp community gets together, we can be hard on each other, from having our own strong opinions that aren’t being taken seriously in today’s world. To those who are just a little more independent than others—no wonder, we have trouble getting along as a community. My question, to my society, is, how come we are fighting for the respect of the outside world, but when we are within our society, we can’t respect each other, just remember caring starts at home. 

Once I felt I was in the right place in life, I long to go back. Being away from the cerebral palsy community, I started missing it. I realized how much it helped me accept who I was with cp. It also got me to understand the power that my cerebral palsy gives me. Now that I’m fully independent, I have more to offer people in the community by sharing my new chapter.

“Knowing the power of your disability can make you look at life a little easier. Understanding your disability can not only empower you but those we teach around you

”-Marie W.O.W.C.P.

Published by sixlegstoindependentlifefromawalker

Hi I'm Marie W.O.W.O.C.P ( Work Out With Cerebral Palsy) Just an average person living with six legs. Two on me and four on my walker. I live a full independent life with cerebral palsy. These are life stories and events about how I overcame everyday life with cerebral palsy. I hope by sharing my life story and lessons I have learned I can help others in the world to show them that disability is only a word. Just because our body may not be capable of everything we want to do but with a positive outlook on life we can still get where we want and need to be.

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